Workout of the Day:
Front Squat
3-3-3-3
and then,
For time:
10 Thrusters (Heavy – challenge yourself)
50 Double-Unders
8 Thrusters
40 Double-Unders
6 Thrusters
30 Double-Unders
4 Thrusters
20 Double-Unders
2 Thrusters
10 Double-Unders
Fish Oil CrossFit Invictus

Supplements: Fish Oil and other Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Written by Mark Riebel 

When it comes to cardiovascular health, the latest nutritional buzz word is definitely “omega-3 fatty acids,” and significant amounts of studies show that this is rightfully earned. An early study of Eskimos in Greenland noted that their diet which was high in omega-3 (ω-3) containing fatty fish resulted in a much lower incidence of cardiovascular disease than did Danes or Americans. In the several decades since, ω-3’s have been studied exhaustively, showing improvements ranging from blood chemistry to treatment of macular degeneration. The FDA released an official statement in 2004 substantiating the cardiovascular health benefits of DHA and EPA, though they did not comment on the other supposed benefits. This post is written on the premise that ω-3’s have a legitimate benefit to health.

As Barry Sears explains in Enter the Zone, ω-3 fatty acids work by acting as building blocks for things called eicosanoids (eye-KAH-sah-noids), which are short-lived substances in your body that regulate things such as inflammation and immune response. The “good” eicosanoids derived from ω-3’s have anti-inflammatory properties, and are thought to improve cardiovascular health through increased blood flow. On the other hand, “bad” eicosanoids lead to increased inflammation and thereby decreased heart health. The three ω-3’s that you hear the most about are α-linoleic acid (ALA) which comes from sources such as flax seed, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) which are most often found in fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel.

There are multiple ways of getting sufficient ω-3’s from your everyday diet (I feel this is the best option), but if your diet doesn’t happen to include these natural sources of ω-3’s, supplements may be an option. Many choose supplements due to concerns over toxins in fish.

The World Health Organization recommends approximately 0.3-0.5 g/day of EPA+DHA and 0.8-1.1 g/day of ALA, the FDA recommends not exceeding 3 g/day of EPA+DHA with no more than 2 g coming from supplements, while others including CrossFit nutrition guru Robb Wolf say that up to 1-2 g/10 lbs. of body weight/day is perfectly safe and beneficial. If you aren’t a fan of supplements and don’t appreciate fatty fish, know that ALA can be converted to EPA and DHA by the body, but only at an effective amount around 2-15%, so you’re better off with the fish than mega-dosing on the flax seed.

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CJ MartinWayneLittle Cheddies McBean (aka Coryna)christineMark Riebel Recent comment authors
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mike
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mike

Dude, AT, I was JUST talking about using that weight with someone else today. Outstanding work, brotha!

Invictus
Member
Invictus

Cynthia, any time you wanna go investigate hamburgers and gas pumps let me know…

Little Cheddies McBean (aka Coryna)
Guest
Little Cheddies McBean (aka Coryna)

Thanks Christine! You are my “anything heavy” hero! You can throw around some serious weight lady! Strong women rock the hiz-ouse!

AT
Guest
AT

175lbs Thrusters (broken sets)
15:14
Goal was strength and heavy not time.

Lizzle
Guest
Lizzle

Cynthia- WTF is an antique gas pump? And what could we make of the dead cat coming back to life and re-dying x5 in my ZMA dreams? And finally, is there a difference between ZMA and the stuff I am taking Calcium Magnesium and Zinc. Am I missing something w/out the Vit B6? PS wacko dreams seems to subside after awhile. Hamburger . . . yummy.

christine
Guest
christine

Cornya is my double-under hero!

Mark Riebel
Guest
Mark Riebel

Cynthia,

That’s one of the next posts coming.

Cynthia
Guest
Cynthia

Pretty bitchin having Liz to play with this morning. She is one strong mo-fo! Speaking of supplements, I’ve talked to a few people taking ZMA (zinc, magnesium, Vit B6) and decided to give it a shot. Taken at night about 30 minutes before bed, it supposedly helps with recovery by replenishing those minerals. I’ve looked up a couple of studies, but they’re too sciency! All I know is that since I started taking the stuff two nights ago, I’ve slept better than I have in a long time. And a really fun side effect of ZMA (I guess due to… Read more »

August
Guest
August

Would love to go to the old Bee Charmers ceremony, but can’t fit it in… bummer.

Lizzle
Guest
Lizzle

Mark- Thanks for listening to me talk about my shoulder and encouraging me to go w/lighter weight. Solid consultation. A mi me gusta. My shoulder and bicep tendon feel good and that makes me happy 🙂

Chris F
Guest
Chris F

I’d fancy 15 lb dumbbells. :0

mike
Guest
mike

Men usually use 135 lbs. as that would be the Rx’d weight but some guys are exceptionally strong so I’ve heard of people going heavier. I would fancy trying this WOD with 155 lbs. but the weight may just crush me.

Sean
Guest
Sean

I went with 155 and weigh around 160-165.

That and the front squats prior made for a fun challenging workout

AT
Guest
AT

Recommended weight. What weight are people using for “heavy”?

Chris F
Guest
Chris F

Fish Oil – I love the stuff. If you aren’t taking it, I would encourage you to invest in a bottle. I have found it to be super effective at reducing inflammation (which also reduces pain!). I also believe that it’s contributed to me losing 9 lbs of fat over the last 10 weeks. ** Just a friendly reminder: I would love the pleasure of everyone’s company at my retirement ceremony on NAB Coronado. It’s this coming Thursday, 21 May 2009 at 1000. Gate passes/invitations are on the CFI reception desk. My brothers Nick and Nate are part of the… Read more »

Sean
Guest
Sean

Just thought I’d add my 2 cents. Fish that are farmed raised or livestock that are grain fed do not provide as adequate source of omega-3 nutrients as those that are wild caught or grass fed. Mainly because they are not fed their natural diet. Also, almonds and walnuts are a good source’s of omega-3’s besides flaxseed.

Thanks Mark for suggesting the heavier weight…was going to go that heavy but now I’m glad I did.

FAQ - Workout of the Day (WOD)

What does WOD mean in CrossFit?

WOD stands for Workout of the Day. Most CrossFit gyms post one workout each day for their members and online followers to complete. Invictus currently offers THREE free programmed WODs each day (shown above)... and even more personalized and online supplemental programs through Invictus Athlete.

Which program is right for me? Can I move between them?

One thing that sets Invictus apart from other CrossFit gyms and online training programs is that we recognize everyone has different fitness goals, abilities and needs. Be sure to pick which programming is right for you so you can get a great workout that meets your needs.

What does 30X0 mean? (How to read the WOD)

Another thing you might notice that’s different about our programming is that we use ‘tempo training’ - almost always in the Fitness programming and in various cycles for the Performance and Competition programs. Those extra numbers (ex: @30X0) might seem confusing at first glance but you’ll totally get how it works and why we like to use it after reading this. Trust us, you’ll soon witness the many benefits firsthand. Learn more about tempo training.

I need help with some standard movements and warm-up ideas!

Whether you’re new to CrossFit or have lots of experience with the WOD, our coaches will help you get the most out of every workout. It doesn’t matter if you struggle with a particular movement or if your goals are pushing you toward the higher skilled and more elusive movements, our professional coaches support everyone with advice and feedback.

They have worked with all athlete levels and know what it takes to get people moving to the best of their abilities. Whether it’s burpees, double-unders, muscle-ups, or tips for the Assault Bike - we’ve got a coach who can help you.

Don’t worry, we’ve got your warm-ups covered, too. Our coaches are constantly learning from other modalities and love to use what they learn in innovative warm-ups focused on both preparing for the workout at hand and maintaining the body for a pain free life. Check out this full body routine to keep your joints functioning and free of inflammation. We also post warm-up suggestions in the Workout of the Day for each of the programs that are tailored to that day’s movements.

Workout on your own and don’t have much time for your warm-up? Here’s a couple of quick and simple ones for your shoulders, squat day, deadlifts, and everyone’s problem area, the thoracic spine.

What if I can’t lift the weight or do the movement as prescribed?

Scaling is part of the beauty of CrossFit because it enables workouts and programming to be tailored to anyone’s ability. When it comes to weight, you can and should ALWAYS scale the weight down if it is unsafe for you to lift it, or if it changes the intended stimulus of the workout.

Here are some rules of thumb for scaling weight in metcons (lifting for time). For gymnastics movements, there are some simple scaling solutions as well. If you are unsure, reach out to your Invictus coach! We are here to make sure you get the safest and best workout possible - proper scaling allows for that.

How many days per week should I train? / How many rest days should I take?

At Invictus, we offer programming 6 days a week, Monday-Saturday and we realize not everyone’s schedule - or training needs - are the same and therefore, you must use your best judgement and listen to your body when it comes to deciding how often to take a rest day.

If you have been doing CrossFit for a while now, you recognize that our program excels due to the high intensity component. With that being said, one thing you have to keep in mind is that you can’t sustain that high intensity every single day; otherwise your body ends up breaking down.

You can learn more about how often someone should take a rest day in this article.

What does EMOM stand for?

EMOM stands for Every Minute on the Minute. When you see that come up in a workout, you have up to one minute to complete the exercise required. Normally what’s prescribed won’t take the entire minute so you also have whatever is left of the time to rest until the next minute starts and you do the next set of prescribed work. And so on.

What does AMRAP mean?

AMRAP means “As Many Rounds (and Reps) as Possible” in a certain time period. For example, the workout might say...

AMRAP in 10 minutes of:

30 Double-Unders
20 Pull-Ups
10 Thrusters

So you would keep going through the cycle of those three exercises until the 10 minutes is up. Your score is the number of complete rounds plus any extra reps you did. So if you did four complete rounds plus 15 Double-Unders in the fifth round, your score would be 4+15.

What does OTM mean?

OTM stands for “On the Minute” and is the same thing as an EMOM. When you see that come up in a workout, you have up to one minute to complete the exercise required. Normally what’s prescribed won’t take the entire minute so you also have whatever is left of the time to rest until the next minute starts and you do the next set of prescribed work. And so on.

What does NFT mean?

NFT stands for “Not for Time” and means that you shouldn’t rush or try to go fast, but instead, focus on technique, skill, form or whatever you are working on for that movement.

How heavy should my first set be?

You might also be wondering where to start your first set if, for example, the workout of the day calls for 5 sets of Deadlift x 5 reps. Is the first set a warm-up or is that the first working set? Here’s our recommendation for how to properly build to your starting weight and what we consider warm-up sets and working sets.

How can I figure out my 1RM?

We frequently use percentage references in prescribing the number of reps to perform, so it’s essential that you have a good idea on most of your maxes.

Let’s say it’s been awhile since you have attempted a 1RM; maybe you had an injury a few months ago, or maybe you just somehow keep missing the 1-RM test days, or maybe you just forgot to write it down in your log book. If you have a multiple-rep max, you’re in luck. There’s actually a simple equation you can use to calculate an estimated 1RM based on the max number of reps you can do at a given weight.