Workout of the Day:
“Fran”

Rounds of 21, 15 and 9 reps of:
95/65 lb. Thrusters
Pull-Ups
(Compare to results from February 9-10.)

Our two teams took first and third place at the Camp Pendleton Mud Run on Saturday. Next task, world domination.
Our two teams took first and third place at the Camp Pendleton Mud Run on Saturday. Next task, world domination.

 

And check out the number of medals obtained by CrossFit affiliates this weekend. Greg Amundson ran his team to a medal in the law enforcement category, and Team CrossFit took honors in both the team and individual "boots and utes" categories. Not bad for a group of athletes that hate to run.
And check out the number of medals obtained by CrossFit affiliates this weekend. Greg Amundson ran his team to a medal in the law enforcement category, and Team CrossFit took honors in both the team and individual "boots and utes" categories. Not bad for a group of athletes that hate to run.

Are You Over-Training, or Under-Recovering?
Written by Calvin Sun

Are you really overtraining? Sure, you might be experiencing some of the symptoms of overtraining but are you really training that hard? Michele’s post on overtraining suggests that working out without rest leads to the condition. I agree with Michele that people who do two workouts everyday under the assumption that more is better will quickly hit a point of diminishing returns. However, in my experience, I think the larger problem for the majority of our athletes is not training enough. Let’s be honest, on average, how many days a week do you train? If you only manage to get in 3 or 4 days a week, you are not overtrained. Yet you complain of fatigue, altered sleep patterns, mood swings, increased frequency of illness, persistent muscle soreness, and weight loss. Have you ever considered you might be under-recovered? You might not be doing too many WODs, instead you probably aren’t doing enough to make sure you are properly recovered from your training. Rest is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to recovery. There are many aspects to proper recovery:

Nutrition
Nutrition is the biochemical foundation that fuels our bodies. You can’t repair muscles without adequate intake of high-quality protein. Chicken, fish, beef, and eggs are all great choices because of their complete amino acid profiles. Carbohydrates are stored in your muscles and liver as glycogen. You need to eat some quality carbohydrates in order to replenish yourself. Vegetables, fruits, and some starchy tubers (i.e. sweet potatoes) are all good choices. Grab one of Michele’s delicious “Invictus Shots” after your next WOD to make sure you are getting the fuel your body needs. Don’t forget to eat some healthy fat as well. Besides serving as an energy source, fat helps you absorb fat-soluble nutrients like vitamins A, D, E, and K. Read the The Paleo Diet for Athletes by Dr. Loren Cordain for more information.

Sleep
Get at least 7 to 8 hours of sleep every night. During sleep, your body releases a chemical cocktail that will help enhance your recovery and give you the greatest benefit from your training. Muscle tissues are repaired and the central nervous system is rejuvenated allowing for you to train at peak performance the next day.

Rest Days
As I mentioned earlier, Michele is spot on with this one. If you are training hard enough, you will need to rest once every 2 to 3 days. Following a 3-on/1-off schedule or even a 3-on/1-off/2-on/1-off schedule would serve to benefit you. Active recovery is great, go for a swim, a quick jog, or even a round of golf.

Myofascial Release
The repeated microtrauma from training everyday can take its toll on your body. Adhesions and trigger points can lead to all sorts of pain in both your muscles and your joints. Grab a foam roller and start rolling out your muscles. Lats, pecs, traps, glutes, quads, and hip flexors are the hot spots you’ll definitely want to hit everyday. Lacrosse balls are great for calves and glutes as well. The taped balls are perfect for rolling the thoracic erectors as well performing t-spine mobilization. Feel free to schedule a massage but you’ll want to make sure you are doing some damage control on a daily basis. 

Stretching
Do not save the stretching for rest days. Tight hamstrings, tight calves and tight hip flexors are often to blame for the pain and injuries experienced by athletes. Do yourself a favor and stretch out after every workout. You don’t have to stretch out immediately after the WOD. I realize people have to get to work or get home for dinner, just make sure you do stretch sometime between the completion of your workout and your 7 to 8 hours of sleep.  

NSAIDs
Lay off the Motrin. There is a normal healing process that occurs after an injury. The first 2 to 4 days are the inflammatory response phase. This phase is essential for initiating the healing process. When you take a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, like ibuprofen, the entire healing process is halted. Read more in Kelly Starrett’s article

Cryotherapy
Instead of drugs, use ice as it can help with the inflammation associated with the muscle soreness experienced after training. Use ice packs, ice baths, ice cups, ice massage, just not ice cream.

Fish Oil
Supplementing your diet with fish oil can reduce inflammation as well as help lubricate your joints. Read Mark’s post here. Dietary supplements should always be the last thing to add to your recovery program. Make sure your nutrition is solid before adding fish oil or any other supplement for that matter.

Having an effective and comprehensive recovery program in place is essential for your continued success as an athlete. Failing to do so will inevitably lead to training plateaus and/or injuries. You should strive to combat under-recovery with the same persistence and dedication that you have in your training. Remember, elite human performance requires an equally high level of maintenance and care.

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Yadira
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Yadira

Yadira says:
“FRAN”
February 09, 2009 June 8, 2009
Time 6:19 Time 5:40

HEY “CJ”,
I did write my time down. I guess I did improve on my time. Now I know what you mean on why it’s important to keep a record of our WODs. 🙂
Thanks for cheering me Kate.

Taush
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Taush

Congrats to all….AWESOME job!! Courtney….you will have to teach me how to not “spill a drop”….hmmmm, practice makes perfect.

POS
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POS

Cynthia, great idea. It could double as a cooler for frosty beverages for post WOD carbohydrate replenishment.

Sean
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Sean

I was curious, any benefit to utilizing a jacuzzi, steam room and/or sauna? other than for relaxing.

Cynthia
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Cynthia

Hey how about a kiddie pool filled up with ice and water? Barry and I can bring one up to Aromas in the camping house, if you guys want us to.

And we can have Michele and POS get in it for a while and then we’ll sell their used water to all competitors that want their mojo! $$$$$$$$ 🙂

POS
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POS

Comment on the Ice Bath:

After each of my heats at the NE Qualifier I took a 10 min on 10 min off ice bath for at least 2 – 3 cycles. Now I am not saying that is the reason my legs felt good for the 2K row but it certainly helped. We might have to have one with us up in Aromas.

Cody-Mac
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Cody-Mac

sweet thanks Mark. i was actually looking on bodybuilding.com for some creatine anyways, it’s a great site with awesome prices. congrats to everyone who competed this weekend, you guys killed it!

Mark Riebel
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Mark Riebel

Excellent job to my fellow mud-runners this weekend, it was really a blast to run with you guys. Considering I had run maybe a mile or two in the months leading up to this, I had quite a lot of lingering soreness yesterday and decided to take one of the dreaded ice baths that Calvin mentioned above. As much as I hate the cold, I went down to the store, bought a few 20# bags of ice, dumped them in the tub with some water and jumped in. After a minute or two, I was able to breathe again and… Read more »

Michele Vieux
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Michele Vieux

Great post Cal! Thanks for the expansion and added detail from my post. Yes, these issues are probably more common than overtraining for those who have been CrossFitting for some amount of time. I usually find that those who are suspect of overtraining are pretty new to CrossFit (myself & Mark included). I used to CF six times per week then run 3-4 times per week and swim 2-3 times per week thinking “more is better”. It took me a few months to figure out that wasn’t the case at all. It took me nearly two years to hop on… Read more »

Boozebag
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Boozebag

Well Cynthia, I am a professional.

POS
Guest
POS

Congrats Team(s) Invictus! That is great. And Momriebel beat me to it…. Where is the MUD??

clever
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clever

nice work folks! i ran a few years back… by my lonesome… and didn’t win nuttin! but super fun? o yes. herpaps next year i’ll see u folks there.

Momriebel
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Momriebel

Congrats to everyone!!!! You look pretty clean for a mud run!!!

Cynthia
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Cynthia

And Courtney didn’t spill a drop of her drink!! Yaahoooo!

Congrats to you muddy buddies!

Boozebag
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Boozebag

In the words of the great Michele Vieux: double whoot to team invictus!!! Great job to my fellow teammates and thanks for being patient with me (the turtle of the group). We’re taking first, second, and third next year baby! 🙂

Jessie
Guest
Jessie

MIXED TEAMS
1 9 305 RIEBEL CROSSFIT INVICT MIXED 1:01:19
2 17 373 MOROTANI THATS WHAT SHE MIXED 1:04:39
3 19 345 MARTIN CROSSFIT INVICT MIXED 1:05:03
Ya baby! Go team! 🙂

FAQ - Workout of the Day (WOD)

What does WOD mean in CrossFit?

WOD stands for Workout of the Day. Most CrossFit gyms post one workout each day for their members and online followers to complete. Invictus currently offers THREE free programmed WODs each day (shown above)... and even more personalized and online supplemental programs through Invictus Athlete.

Which program is right for me? Can I move between them?

One thing that sets Invictus apart from other CrossFit gyms and online training programs is that we recognize everyone has different fitness goals, abilities and needs. Be sure to pick which programming is right for you so you can get a great workout that meets your needs.

What does 30X0 mean? (How to read the WOD)

Another thing you might notice that’s different about our programming is that we use ‘tempo training’ - almost always in the Fitness programming and in various cycles for the Performance and Competition programs. Those extra numbers (ex: @30X0) might seem confusing at first glance but you’ll totally get how it works and why we like to use it after reading this. Trust us, you’ll soon witness the many benefits firsthand. Learn more about tempo training.

I need help with some standard movements and warm-up ideas!

Whether you’re new to CrossFit or have lots of experience with the WOD, our coaches will help you get the most out of every workout. It doesn’t matter if you struggle with a particular movement or if your goals are pushing you toward the higher skilled and more elusive movements, our professional coaches support everyone with advice and feedback.

They have worked with all athlete levels and know what it takes to get people moving to the best of their abilities. Whether it’s burpees, double-unders, muscle-ups, or tips for the Assault Bike - we’ve got a coach who can help you.

Don’t worry, we’ve got your warm-ups covered, too. Our coaches are constantly learning from other modalities and love to use what they learn in innovative warm-ups focused on both preparing for the workout at hand and maintaining the body for a pain free life. Check out this full body routine to keep your joints functioning and free of inflammation. We also post warm-up suggestions in the Workout of the Day for each of the programs that are tailored to that day’s movements.

Workout on your own and don’t have much time for your warm-up? Here’s a couple of quick and simple ones for your shoulders, squat day, deadlifts, and everyone’s problem area, the thoracic spine.

What if I can’t lift the weight or do the movement as prescribed?

Scaling is part of the beauty of CrossFit because it enables workouts and programming to be tailored to anyone’s ability. When it comes to weight, you can and should ALWAYS scale the weight down if it is unsafe for you to lift it, or if it changes the intended stimulus of the workout.

Here are some rules of thumb for scaling weight in metcons (lifting for time). For gymnastics movements, there are some simple scaling solutions as well. If you are unsure, reach out to your Invictus coach! We are here to make sure you get the safest and best workout possible - proper scaling allows for that.

How many days per week should I train? / How many rest days should I take?

At Invictus, we offer programming 6 days a week, Monday-Saturday and we realize not everyone’s schedule - or training needs - are the same and therefore, you must use your best judgement and listen to your body when it comes to deciding how often to take a rest day.

If you have been doing CrossFit for a while now, you recognize that our program excels due to the high intensity component. With that being said, one thing you have to keep in mind is that you can’t sustain that high intensity every single day; otherwise your body ends up breaking down.

You can learn more about how often someone should take a rest day in this article.

What does EMOM stand for?

EMOM stands for Every Minute on the Minute. When you see that come up in a workout, you have up to one minute to complete the exercise required. Normally what’s prescribed won’t take the entire minute so you also have whatever is left of the time to rest until the next minute starts and you do the next set of prescribed work. And so on.

What does AMRAP mean?

AMRAP means “As Many Rounds (and Reps) as Possible” in a certain time period. For example, the workout might say...

AMRAP in 10 minutes of:

30 Double-Unders
20 Pull-Ups
10 Thrusters

So you would keep going through the cycle of those three exercises until the 10 minutes is up. Your score is the number of complete rounds plus any extra reps you did. So if you did four complete rounds plus 15 Double-Unders in the fifth round, your score would be 4+15.

What does OTM mean?

OTM stands for “On the Minute” and is the same thing as an EMOM. When you see that come up in a workout, you have up to one minute to complete the exercise required. Normally what’s prescribed won’t take the entire minute so you also have whatever is left of the time to rest until the next minute starts and you do the next set of prescribed work. And so on.

What does NFT mean?

NFT stands for “Not for Time” and means that you shouldn’t rush or try to go fast, but instead, focus on technique, skill, form or whatever you are working on for that movement.

How heavy should my first set be?

You might also be wondering where to start your first set if, for example, the workout of the day calls for 5 sets of Deadlift x 5 reps. Is the first set a warm-up or is that the first working set? Here’s our recommendation for how to properly build to your starting weight and what we consider warm-up sets and working sets.

How can I figure out my 1RM?

We frequently use percentage references in prescribing the number of reps to perform, so it’s essential that you have a good idea on most of your maxes.

Let’s say it’s been awhile since you have attempted a 1RM; maybe you had an injury a few months ago, or maybe you just somehow keep missing the 1-RM test days, or maybe you just forgot to write it down in your log book. If you have a multiple-rep max, you’re in luck. There’s actually a simple equation you can use to calculate an estimated 1RM based on the max number of reps you can do at a given weight.