Workout of the Day:
Front Squat
3-3-3
and then,
Max rounds in three minutes of the following complex:
* Snatch (95/65 lb.)
* Overhead Squat
* Jumping Squat (with Barbell on Back)
* Right Leg Lunge
* Left Leg Lunge
* Rack Jerk
Repeat for a total of five cycles, resting for one minute between each cycle.

Impostors - Nobody does it as well as the Hammer himself
Impostors - Nobody does it as well as the Hammer himself

The Great Equalizer
Written by Mike “The Hammer” Hom

As one of the head judges at the SoCal Regional Qualifiers, I was fortunate to receive substantial feedback, positive and negative, on the workouts, the standards, and the enforcement of the established rules. One comment really stood out in my mind. For brevity, the basic gist of the comment (in the form of a question) was the following, “I did really well on the first workout, but I didn’t do too hot on the second one. Why did we have to do overhead squats?  I hate those!”

As much as I wanted to sympathize with the competitors that gave me similar feedback, I couldn’t help but flip the question around to, “Why aren’t you working on your weaknesses?”

I will readily admit that I have plenty of things to work on, which is the beauty of CrossFit. No matter how much I improve, there is always room for improvement. The Japanese philosophy of “kaizen” definitely fits into the CrossFit mold:  focus on continuous improvement throughout all aspects of life. When you apply this to your training, Kaizen is the commitment to improve all aspects of your fitness whether it be your nutrition, your metabolic conditioning, your strength, or your ability to perform certain movements. The end result is to maximize the efficiency of your movement and the efficacy of your training.

While some of you may not intend on competing at the Games or look at CrossFit as anything but simply an outlet to develop your overall fitness and health, remember that chasing your strengths will invariably lead to a situation where you are always hoping you will not have to face something you are not good at. Take note of your weaknesses and make the conscious effort to improve them, so that you are not caught between a rock and hard spot when they show up in a workout.

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Mark RiebelCoryna (apparently, aka Little Cheddies McBean)AmandaTaushaTabitha Recent comment authors
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Mark Riebel
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Mark Riebel

C-Note, I doubt their numbers are very good. I think it’s more along the lines of giving another excuse to those who don’t want to have any healthy habits.

Coryna (apparently, aka Little Cheddies McBean)
Guest
Coryna (apparently, aka Little Cheddies McBean)

I would love to see their statistical analysis for their findings…

I am such a math nerd.

Amanda
Guest
Amanda

Ha ha ha! So Mark, which is more contagious, the obesity virus or the swine flu?

Cynthia
Guest
Cynthia

That would literally make them a fat pig.

Amanda
Guest
Amanda

Great workout! And I second what Wayne said about obesity. Just think if a really fat person contracted Swine Flu…no chance.

Tausha
Guest
Tausha

I LOVE this picture….you ladies look viciously beautiful!! 🙂

Tabitha
Guest
Tabitha

Fitting that this post should be on a day in which the workout includes one of my greatest weaknesses… front squats!!

Now I’ve definitely gotta show up and see what my quads can do tonight.

Mark Riebel
Guest
Mark Riebel

AHHHH!! Damn that obesity virus, it’s contagious too!

http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20070820/obesity-virus-more-bigger-fat-cells

wayne
Member
wayne

Hammer, I think this mentality can easily be applied to life outside of the gym. It can allow you to discover some fascinating things, and maybe some new life passions.

On another note… Swine Flu has killed 1 person in the US. Obesity has killed 821 people TODAY! Please wash your hands, but more importantly please inform your fat friends that they could die at any moment.

Wink out.

Source: http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/o/obesity/deaths.htm

Dani
Guest
Dani

Okay, Okay…Snax why do I look like an agricultural excavator and Cynthia, come on now I cannot be that scary. Mike, well said. We always want to do what we are good at, but true growth comes when we brave our weaknesses and our fears. Bee Charmer, I am going to put my personal feelings aside…I am glad you had fun at CF Ventura. Just remember CFI will forever be your home. 😉 I will cherish every morning we have you guys. Enjoy your weekend…look forward to seeing the kiddies soon. Oh and a very, very Happy Birthday to Jessie.… Read more »

Cynthia
Guest
Cynthia

Dani, you scare the crap outta me. Now I know how those other gals felt.

I love creamsicle dip.

If you’re interested: SD Humane Society (sdhumane.org) walk tomorrow at Crown Point, Mission Bay. Come see me at the Mobile Adoption area with all the cuuuuuuute furry puppies. Awwww…..

Lizzle
Guest
Lizzle

You biatches are hot!!!

Ben Sullins
Member
Ben Sullins

For some reason OHS works for me. Today’s workout (front squats) are much harder I think. Mainly this is due to my lack of flexibility which makes it hard to hold the bar in front of me w/o feeling like I’m breaking my wrists. Which is why I’m excited about today’s workout!

I love how CF constantly forces you to push yourself beyond what you *thought* were your limits. Now if I can only find a way to not break open my calluses life would be grand 😉

Thom
Guest
Thom

I loathe and despise OHS. They are quite possibly the worst physical excercise ever created. Hell to me is a constant OHS WOD. The Devil himself could not have come up with something more sadistic. They are designed for short people with tiny femurs and ridiculously flexible shoulders. Neither of which apply to me. Those are all the things that I tell myself right before an OHS workout. That being said, I try and do every OHS WOD that CFI does. If you don’t work at it, you’ll never get better! Maybe one day I will break through 100 lb… Read more »

Chris
Guest
Chris

Well said Hammer! That look on the faces of Dani and Christina is similar to one you get from Hammer and Calvin when they are evaluating a poorly executed OHS (I should know!). I had the pleasure of hitting up the WOD at CF Ventura yesterday. Very cool bunch of people and an awesome affiliate. Funny thing happened though……..I had glanced at their blog for the WOD and was looking fwd to some shoulder presses and ring dips. When I got there, I noticed some strange letters on the whiteboard that looked like “FGB”. The owner (super cool guy, Bill… Read more »

POS
Guest
POS

San Diego oops!

POS
Guest
POS

Goodmorning Sand Diego!
Fun Complex this morning.
34 Rounds with 115# (6-6-7-7-8)

Nick
Guest
Nick

Judging from the picture above, I would have to say, Dani is an Outstanding CFI coach by night and some sort of agricultural excavator ( rutabagas perhaps) during the long hot day. ; )

FAQ - Workout of the Day (WOD)

What does WOD mean in CrossFit?

WOD stands for Workout of the Day. Most CrossFit gyms post one workout each day for their members and online followers to complete. Invictus currently offers THREE free programmed WODs each day (shown above)... and even more personalized and online supplemental programs through Invictus Athlete.

Which program is right for me? Can I move between them?

One thing that sets Invictus apart from other CrossFit gyms and online training programs is that we recognize everyone has different fitness goals, abilities and needs. Be sure to pick which programming is right for you so you can get a great workout that meets your needs.

What does 30X0 mean? (How to read the WOD)

Another thing you might notice that’s different about our programming is that we use ‘tempo training’ - almost always in the Fitness programming and in various cycles for the Performance and Competition programs. Those extra numbers (ex: @30X0) might seem confusing at first glance but you’ll totally get how it works and why we like to use it after reading this. Trust us, you’ll soon witness the many benefits firsthand. Learn more about tempo training.

I need help with some standard movements and warm-up ideas!

Whether you’re new to CrossFit or have lots of experience with the WOD, our coaches will help you get the most out of every workout. It doesn’t matter if you struggle with a particular movement or if your goals are pushing you toward the higher skilled and more elusive movements, our professional coaches support everyone with advice and feedback.

They have worked with all athlete levels and know what it takes to get people moving to the best of their abilities. Whether it’s burpees, double-unders, muscle-ups, or tips for the Assault Bike - we’ve got a coach who can help you.

Don’t worry, we’ve got your warm-ups covered, too. Our coaches are constantly learning from other modalities and love to use what they learn in innovative warm-ups focused on both preparing for the workout at hand and maintaining the body for a pain free life. Check out this full body routine to keep your joints functioning and free of inflammation. We also post warm-up suggestions in the Workout of the Day for each of the programs that are tailored to that day’s movements.

Workout on your own and don’t have much time for your warm-up? Here’s a couple of quick and simple ones for your shoulders, squat day, deadlifts, and everyone’s problem area, the thoracic spine.

What if I can’t lift the weight or do the movement as prescribed?

Scaling is part of the beauty of CrossFit because it enables workouts and programming to be tailored to anyone’s ability. When it comes to weight, you can and should ALWAYS scale the weight down if it is unsafe for you to lift it, or if it changes the intended stimulus of the workout.

Here are some rules of thumb for scaling weight in metcons (lifting for time). For gymnastics movements, there are some simple scaling solutions as well. If you are unsure, reach out to your Invictus coach! We are here to make sure you get the safest and best workout possible - proper scaling allows for that.

How many days per week should I train? / How many rest days should I take?

At Invictus, we offer programming 6 days a week, Monday-Saturday and we realize not everyone’s schedule - or training needs - are the same and therefore, you must use your best judgement and listen to your body when it comes to deciding how often to take a rest day.

If you have been doing CrossFit for a while now, you recognize that our program excels due to the high intensity component. With that being said, one thing you have to keep in mind is that you can’t sustain that high intensity every single day; otherwise your body ends up breaking down.

You can learn more about how often someone should take a rest day in this article.

What does EMOM stand for?

EMOM stands for Every Minute on the Minute. When you see that come up in a workout, you have up to one minute to complete the exercise required. Normally what’s prescribed won’t take the entire minute so you also have whatever is left of the time to rest until the next minute starts and you do the next set of prescribed work. And so on.

What does AMRAP mean?

AMRAP means “As Many Rounds (and Reps) as Possible” in a certain time period. For example, the workout might say...

AMRAP in 10 minutes of:

30 Double-Unders
20 Pull-Ups
10 Thrusters

So you would keep going through the cycle of those three exercises until the 10 minutes is up. Your score is the number of complete rounds plus any extra reps you did. So if you did four complete rounds plus 15 Double-Unders in the fifth round, your score would be 4+15.

What does OTM mean?

OTM stands for “On the Minute” and is the same thing as an EMOM. When you see that come up in a workout, you have up to one minute to complete the exercise required. Normally what’s prescribed won’t take the entire minute so you also have whatever is left of the time to rest until the next minute starts and you do the next set of prescribed work. And so on.

What does NFT mean?

NFT stands for “Not for Time” and means that you shouldn’t rush or try to go fast, but instead, focus on technique, skill, form or whatever you are working on for that movement.

How heavy should my first set be?

You might also be wondering where to start your first set if, for example, the workout of the day calls for 5 sets of Deadlift x 5 reps. Is the first set a warm-up or is that the first working set? Here’s our recommendation for how to properly build to your starting weight and what we consider warm-up sets and working sets.

How can I figure out my 1RM?

We frequently use percentage references in prescribing the number of reps to perform, so it’s essential that you have a good idea on most of your maxes.

Let’s say it’s been awhile since you have attempted a 1RM; maybe you had an injury a few months ago, or maybe you just somehow keep missing the 1-RM test days, or maybe you just forgot to write it down in your log book. If you have a multiple-rep max, you’re in luck. There’s actually a simple equation you can use to calculate an estimated 1RM based on the max number of reps you can do at a given weight.