The Fuzz
Written by Calvin Sun

Most movement issues we see are due to what most people describe as muscle “stiffness” and/or “tightness.” In reality, your muscles are really numerous sliding surfaces built upon more sliding surfaces. Often problems arise when these surfaces no longer slide very well. Take a look at the photo above, see the cobweb-like structures on both sides? That is fuzz that has accumulated in between tissue surfaces. “Fuzz” is almost like an adhesive in that it causes your sliding surfaces to stick together as if they were glued down. This can result in poor positioning, diminished force production, and tends to rob you of maximal efficiency and performance. Even worse, you can put yourself on the fast track to injury if you let your untamed fuzz accumulate. You probably didn’t know it, but you are a fuzz making machine. Dr. Gil Hedley explains further in this video (just a warning, it does contain images of human cadavers so don’t watch if that kind of thing bothers you or if you are reading this while eating your lunch).

So, what causes fuzz to build up? There are a lot of reasons, but the bottom line is that inflammation is the primary cause. Typically this is inflammation from muscular damage like that sustained from working out, but it can also be worsened by systemic inflammation from a poor diet or disease. Inflammation from working out is unavoidable. However, you can make things easier on your body by icing your muscles and joints as well as avoiding foods that can cause inflammation – grains and gluten, for example.

As Dr. Hedley notes, you need to stretch and move in order to “melt” the fuzz that is building up in your body everyday (and it’s probably no coincidence the stuff resembles cobwebs). This is one of the many reasons why we perform dynamic warm-ups as part of our group classes. It’s also part of why we instruct everyone on self-myofasical release (ex: foam roller and lacrosse ball) techniques as well as band-assisted stretches. Yoga and massage therapy are also great ways to help keep the fuzz at bay. Whatever you choose, just make sure you are being proactive in your tissue health and working to reduce the amount of fuzz in your tissues.

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Renush
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Renush

The online games is learning many things to be adapt in our daily basis experiences like it is improving http://myspades.org our communication skills with social activities.

Dan
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Dan

Most people don’t associate working out with learning. They go to the gym, get all swelled up and sweaty, and then go home without thinking about the damage they could be doing to their bodies if they’re lifting improperly (all of that internal rotation jazz) or the potential gains they could realize if they incorporated mobility into their routine. That is one of the most amazing parts of Invictus. Not only do you guys develop great (and safe) workouts for us, but you also provide amazingly helpful and interesting information to help us get better and healthier…whether it’s the texture… Read more »

CJ
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CJ

Thanks Dan! Appreciate the kind words.

Lena Caron
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Lena Caron

Great post! I think one of the best tools for education is showing people pictures/videos of exactly what is happening inside your body, and then explaining the relationship to a sensation or feeling that we are so familiar with. I love it! On a related note, I will say that separating fascia is an oddly satisfying maneuver. This is, of course, secondary to studying the extraordinary structure of the human body. My cadaver passed away at 90 years old due to natural causes – you can imagine how much fuzz she had! For those who may be totally disgusted with… Read more »

George E
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George E

Lena,
So awesome to hear from you! And it sounds like you’re still enjoying med school 🙂

Interesting question… Not something I’ve thought about. Part of me feels really attached to my body, but then at that point I won’t have much need for it.

Great post Cal!

Cynthia
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Cynthia

This GROSS picture does more to motivate me than anything I could be told to do.

Guy in video….loves his fuzz. 🙂

Heidi Fearon
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Heidi Fearon

Awesome article Calvin!!! Sitting for long periods of time can also lead to “fuzz”. I love what Kelly does with the jump stretch bands to break up fuzz its super powerful and innovative. Graston, ART, massage, acupuncture , e-stim, cupping it’s all directed at fuzz destruction ; ) I LOVE IT!!!

Mirelle C
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Mirelle C

OMG…I’ve got some fuzz in my left ankle right now!! And here I thought it was just old age and so I’ve been babying the ankle for the longest time. Dear ankle fuzz, be gone with your bad self! I WILL have full range of motion in my ankle once again!

Richard Madrid
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Richard Madrid

cal, i feel like you’re speaking right at me in this post…